Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

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dfbldwn
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Location: NE rural Georgia

Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby dfbldwn » Fri Jun 19, 2015 8:15 am

Damn! I forgot this one.
Ornello wrote:Scanned B&W film will not give quality equal to printing no matter how you process it.
I'm confident you're correct. I'd just like to point out that you haven't seen my enlargements. I have seen them, and intend to avoid that disappointment. Never again.


Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Fri Jun 19, 2015 8:34 am

dfbldwn wrote:Damn! I forgot this one.
Ornello wrote:Scanned B&W film will not give quality equal to printing no matter how you process it.
I'm confident you're correct. I'd just like to point out that you haven't seen my enlargements. I have seen them, and intend to avoid that disappointment. Never again.
A Durst 600 or 606 might be where to start. Use an El-Nikkor 50mm f/2.8 lens. It's the best for the money. There were two versions, the second of course is superior, but not by a huge margin.

This is the older one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-EL-Nikkor ... 1794013524

This is the newer one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-EL-Nikkor ... 1794013524

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Fri Jun 19, 2015 9:34 am

pirateoversixty wrote:Ornello:

How does d-23 compare with your old favorites from Crawley?

Jim M.
I thought you were the original poster. Sorry.

Keith Tapscott.
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Mon Jun 22, 2015 9:21 am

Barry Thorton was a fan of Ilford Perceptol which uses Metol as the only developing agent. When diluted 1+3, Perceptol will give the results that Ornello has already mentioned.
Err towards the generous side with film exposure with this developer.

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Mon Jun 22, 2015 2:46 pm

Keith Tapscott. wrote:Barry Thorton was a fan of Ilford Perceptol which uses Metol as the only developing agent. When diluted 1+3, Perceptol will give the results that Ornello has already mentioned.
Err towards the generous side with film exposure with this developer.
Perceptol is similar to D23 in composition, I believe, as was the late Microdol-X.

See this thread:

http://www.apug.org/forums/archive/inde ... 64948.html

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Thu Jun 25, 2015 8:54 am

Note that it's not possible to change the latitude of film. It is, however, possible to make negatives easier to print.

Jim Appleyard
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Jim Appleyard » Sat Jun 27, 2015 3:36 pm

You can use Rodinal, thousands of other photographer do. You can dilute it up to 1+300, but 1+50 to 1+100 are the most common. It can give you great negatives...if you know what you're doing.

You can also use a staining developer like Pyrocat HD or WD2D. Yes, the negs come out stained. This stain helps to control contrast when printing.

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Sun Jun 28, 2015 7:45 pm

Jim Appleyard wrote:You can use Rodinal, thousands of other photographer do. You can dilute it up to 1+300, but 1+50 to 1+100 are the most common. It can give you great negatives...if you know what you're doing.

You can also use a staining developer like Pyrocat HD or WD2D. Yes, the negs come out stained. This stain helps to control contrast when printing.
You can do anything you damned well please, but those methods will be inferior in many ways. Rodinal is not as sensitive to development by-products as are developers made using Metol; it also yields less speed while accentuating graininess. The question has been asked and answered, by me.
Last edited by Ornello on Tue Jun 30, 2015 9:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

dfbldwn
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby dfbldwn » Mon Jun 29, 2015 11:40 am

Ornello wrote:The question has been asked and answered
Answered well
I did enjoy Keith's mention of Perceptol and his exposure recommendation, also Ornello's link to the Microdol X thread on apug.org

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Mon Oct 26, 2015 9:10 pm


Keith Tapscott.
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Sun Nov 01, 2015 4:38 am

Ethol T.E.C appears to be a developer of the Beutler type.

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Mon Nov 02, 2015 10:43 am

Keith Tapscott. wrote:Ethol T.E.C appears to be a developer of the Beutler type.
Perhaps, but since it is a proprietary formula I can't say. If you're willing to mix your own, I still think D-23 1:1 is hard to beat for control of highlights.

Keith Tapscott.
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Nov 03, 2015 4:19 am

Another option of contrast control is to use two-bath development.

The Leitz two-bath developer as given in The Ilford Manual Of Photography (1958) is of similar composition to D-23.

Solution A;

Metol 5g

Sodium sulphite, anhydrous 100g

Water to make 1 litre.

Solution B;

Sodium sulphite, anhydrous 6g

Sodium carbonate, anhydrous 15g (use 18g for the monohydrate)

Water to make 1 litre.

Start with 4 minutes in solution A followed by 4 minutes in solution B.

I was never a big fan of two-bath devs for general use when I tried them quite a few years ago, but they certainly work well in controlling excessive contrast in tricky lighting conditions.

The Leitz formula above gave excellent acutance with FP4 when I used to use that developer.

Ornello
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Re: Increasing Exposure Latitude in B&W 35mm film

Postby Ornello » Wed Nov 04, 2015 8:29 pm

Most people don't understand how film works. The latitude and speed of the emulsion are largely determined in manufacture. Slow films are slow because the crystals are small, and each crystal is less likely to be struck by a photon because of that. It therefore takes more exposure (more photons) to get a negative of the proper density.

The crystals of slow fine-grain films are smaller and of a narrow size range.


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