35mm b&w processing protocol please...

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

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Dean Taylor
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2012 1:38 am

35mm b&w processing protocol please...

Postby Dean Taylor » Mon Jan 16, 2012 4:23 pm

My ‘beginner’ question might be augmented by noting:

Nikon F100, 50mm f/1.8D, Ilford HP5, Plustek scanner…I will be shooting b & w exclusively.

Q: for someone shooting few rolls of film–-say, three or four rolls per month-–which chemicals (developer, stop bath, fixer, etc.) would you recommend in the interest of 1) attaining a quality image (this is paramount and supercedes all other considerations) and, 2), minimizing wastage–minimal discarded chemicals owing to aging, etc.?

also... of the processing protocol, a noted photographer remarked: "I just wipe down the non-emulsion side of the film." question from a newcomer: is that procedure recommended, i.e., wiping just the one side? By the way, do you use cotton gloves when handling the film (b and h has them, as does freestyle)?

and... In doing my homework before the attempt there seems to be a discrepancy regarding removing the exposed film from the cannister just prior to loading it onto the spool. That is, one procedure suggests drawing the exposed film completely out of the cannister and then spooling it (it seems clumsy, let alone potentially harmful to the film), while the second method, from Ilford, is this one:
"Take hold of the cassette and your end cap remover and turn out the light. Lever the cap off the cassette, and slide the film spool part way out. Find the film‘s shaped leader, slot this through the light-trap opening, then slide the spool back. This saves having 1.4m/4ft 8in of loose film falling on the floor."

thank you all!

Dean Taylor


Ornello
Posts: 832
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: 35mm b&w processing protocol please...

Postby Ornello » Tue Jan 17, 2012 7:21 pm

Dean Taylor wrote:My ‘beginner’ question might be augmented by noting:

Nikon F100, 50mm f/1.8D, Ilford HP5, Plustek scanner…I will be shooting b & w exclusively.

Q: for someone shooting few rolls of film–-say, three or four rolls per month-–which chemicals (developer, stop bath, fixer, etc.) would you recommend in the interest of 1) attaining a quality image (this is paramount and supercedes all other considerations) and, 2), minimizing wastage–minimal discarded chemicals owing to aging, etc.?

also... of the processing protocol, a noted photographer remarked: "I just wipe down the non-emulsion side of the film." question from a newcomer: is that procedure recommended, i.e., wiping just the one side? By the way, do you use cotton gloves when handling the film (b and h has them, as does freestyle)?

and... In doing my homework before the attempt there seems to be a discrepancy regarding removing the exposed film from the cannister just prior to loading it onto the spool. That is, one procedure suggests drawing the exposed film completely out of the cannister and then spooling it (it seems clumsy, let alone potentially harmful to the film), while the second method, from Ilford, is this one:
"Take hold of the cassette and your end cap remover and turn out the light. Lever the cap off the cassette, and slide the film spool part way out. Find the film‘s shaped leader, slot this through the light-trap opening, then slide the spool back. This saves having 1.4m/4ft 8in of loose film falling on the floor."

thank you all!

Dean Taylor
There is no reason to bother shooting B&W film only to turn around and scan it. Use B&W film only if you are going to print it using a darkroom. B&W conventional film scans poorly, looks grainy. So, either shoot C41 film and have it scanned, or shoot B&W and print it, but don't shoot B&W film and scan it. The results are inferior to shooting C41 film and scanning, or to shooting conventional B&W film and printing it..

foolscape
Posts: 181
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 11:01 am
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: 35mm b&w processing protocol please...

Postby foolscape » Sun Jan 22, 2012 3:53 pm

For just a few rolls a month, I would try Kodak HC-110. It's concentrate form lasts for years, and you can mix only what you need. If it's not exhausted, the working solution can keep for a few weeks. The rule of thumb is 6ml of syrup per roll (35mm, 120). The grain is not intrusive, even for 35mm. Various dilutions can give you everything from high to low contrast. It's a common developer, so there's lots of information available.

I usually take the entire roll out of the canister, but Ilford's procedure seems good. I've tried one of those film grabbers that are supposed to be able remove the film without opening the canister, but it didn't work.

Good luck!

--Gary

Ornello
Posts: 832
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: 35mm b&w processing protocol please...

Postby Ornello » Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:43 pm

Again, do not use conventional B&W film for scanning. It looks awful.


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