Search found 194 matches

by Digitaltruth
Mon Nov 07, 2005 6:57 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Film Reticulation
Replies: 8
Views: 18392

Modern emulsions are very hard to affect with differential temperature baths. Although there may be evidence of increased grain, it is minor compared to the full reticulation that you could formerly achieve with a film such as Tri-X. You could try increasing the differential temperature, but even wi...
by Digitaltruth
Mon Oct 03, 2005 5:07 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Increasing Sharpness through Agitation
Replies: 20
Views: 35603

The best way to increase edge definition is to use a high acutance film developer. Paterson Acutol is considered to be one of the highest acutance developers currently in production, and there are other published formulas that you can use to mix your own. For more information see Chapter 6 of Troop ...
by Digitaltruth
Tue Sep 27, 2005 4:00 am
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: TRI-X 400(400TX) push processing@6400
Replies: 2
Views: 9841

There is no such thing as an exact processing time for the conditions you are describing. Stage lighting produces a set of problems which are different from those used to produce "standard" development times. You will need to pay careful attention to the light levels and the materials you ...
by Digitaltruth
Tue Aug 23, 2005 3:10 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Web developer looking for digital printing solution
Replies: 1
Views: 6483

One option would be to find a digital printing service that you can form a relationship with. Then you could build a shopping cart for each of your clients and have the selected images and printing options automatically sent to the printer who could fulfill the order.
by Digitaltruth
Tue Aug 23, 2005 3:03 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Mytol
Replies: 4
Views: 12372

Its more than a quality control issue. Xtol has inherent problems that appear to be related to the interaction of ascorbic acid and air/water. Some people have no problems, other people cannot use it reliably. There is some good information about Xtol on this page: http://www.covingtoninnovations.co...
by Digitaltruth
Wed Aug 03, 2005 5:39 am
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: international supply cold tone developer, oriental paper
Replies: 2
Views: 8377

International shipping of liquid chemicals can be expensive. We can supply you with various formulas for making your own developers from raw powder chemicals. Please contact me for further information.
by Digitaltruth
Mon Jul 25, 2005 8:11 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Efke Film IN PMK Developer
Replies: 5
Views: 13082

I'm not aware of a specific time for Efke 50 in PMK, but would recommend trying something in the region of 8-10 minutes at 21C/70F. You may need to rate the film at 25 ASA for best results. If you do work out a successful combination, please let me know so that it can be added to the Massive Dev Cha...
by Digitaltruth
Thu Jul 07, 2005 3:08 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Preserving B&W film
Replies: 1
Views: 7380

The commonly accepted theory is that film should be frozen or refridgerated prior to use. It should be allowed to reach room temperature naturally before being exposed. After exposure, develop as soon as possible. Obviously, there may be circumstances in which you cannot develop the film for a lengt...
by Digitaltruth
Sun Jun 26, 2005 1:58 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: New Developer... Any info??
Replies: 4
Views: 11032

DA-163 is a basic print developer which seems to be used in India, so you are probably right that it is similar to the product you have been sold. The formula for Kodak D-163, which may also be called DA-163 or a variation of, is as follows: Kodak D 163 Metol 2.20 g Sodium sulfite 75 g Hydroquinone ...
by Digitaltruth
Sat Jun 25, 2005 10:44 am
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Better B & W prints
Replies: 4
Views: 10812

Hi Tom, If you are using TMAX film, then I highly recommend development in F76 plus and printing with Ultra Cold Tone print developer. Both products are available from our site here: http://www.digitaltruth.com/store/clayton2.html You can read more about F76 plus and its superb results here: http://...
by Digitaltruth
Tue Jun 21, 2005 9:17 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Agfaortho
Replies: 1
Views: 8663

Times for Agfa Ortho can be found by clicking on the "Unlisted Data" link in the Massive Dev Chart. Then scroll down to see the times for "Discontinued Film". All of the times listed will yield a high contrast result.
by Digitaltruth
Wed May 18, 2005 9:06 am
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: medium format blues - don't laugh
Replies: 4
Views: 12686

If you are having problems rolling 120 film onto steel reels, then you probably just need to modify your technique. The Hewes reels are the best, they are rock solid and don't bend like many other brands, so there is no reason to change your equipment -- if you do the problem will probably get worse...
by Digitaltruth
Mon May 02, 2005 11:58 am
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: developing Ilford HP5 Plus 400 b&w film
Replies: 2
Views: 12392

The information you have been given is correct, you do not need a stop bath or hypo clear solution. A chemical stop bath is used to arrest development instantaneously, but this is not necessary for the vast majority of applications. Many people use a chemical stop to help prolong the life of the fix...
by Digitaltruth
Thu Apr 21, 2005 1:50 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Developing Maco IR 820c using Clayton F76+
Replies: 1
Views: 8603

The time in the Massive Dev Chart was tested for us last year by an experienced photographer. As a general rule, you can increase times for Jobo developers by about 15% to get a time for use in a small hand tank. I don't know where your dealer has come up with his time, but based on your information...
by Digitaltruth
Tue Apr 19, 2005 1:45 pm
Forum: The Digitaltruth Forum
Topic: Dev chart efke100/acutol typo?
Replies: 1
Views: 8151

The current recommended dilution for Actol is 1+9, so your best best is to use this data as your starting point. Paterson originally specified dilutions of 1+10, 1+20 and 1+30 for Acutol, but at some point (late 1990s?) this was changed to 1+9. I don't know the reason for the change, but it may have...