Rollei B&W 120 infrared film 400 ISO

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MickA
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Rollei B&W 120 infrared film 400 ISO

Postby MickA » Mon Jan 02, 2006 11:39 am

Hi
I believe this medium format IR film is a repackaged Maco film, however under Maco it was classed as 100 ISO not the 400 ISO that Rollei state. I do realise that the ISO has little meaning as such when using an R72 filter.Has anyone experience with this film? can you suggest a suitable developer and starting point as regards development time. At present my only experience with IR film has been with Kodak HIE. Thankyou.


Digitaltruth
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Postby Digitaltruth » Mon Jan 02, 2006 4:55 pm

We are still waiting for published times for most of the new Rollei films, but as you suggest, the original Maco times can be used until further information is available. In the case of Rollei IR film, it appears to be the original Aura film without the anti-halation layer. The times for this film should be similar to the times we have listed for Maco 820c, or in some cases slightly longer due to the absence of the anti-halation layer.
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MickA
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Rollei IR Film

Postby MickA » Mon Jan 02, 2006 6:13 pm

Hello
Thank's for the response, I purchased a box of twelve films but all the acompanying data is in German, I am hopeless with languages. It does have some brief notes in English on the outer wrapper suggesting overexposure to produce a halo effect could this mean it does have an anti-halation backing dye? I guess a presoak will solve the question. I have found a number of other references to this film on other sites, it seems that at present information on this film in it's revised Rollei spec is fairly thin on the ground.

MickA

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Postby Digitaltruth » Mon Jan 02, 2006 6:35 pm

From what I've heard, it doesn't need a presoak and lacks the anti-halation layer. I'm pretty sure it is the Aura version, but maybe someone else that has used these different films will enter this thread and provide more info.

My guess is that the halo effect being referred to is some way of saying that you will get more pronounced IR effects if you overexpose the film. Maybe this explains why the film has a different ISO to its predecessors.
--Jon Mided

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Fotohuis
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Postby Fotohuis » Wed Jan 11, 2006 11:50 am

The Rollei I.R.-400 film is a real iso 400 IR film with extended sensitivity range till 820nm. It can be used with a RG715nm filter. It's a brand new film, made by Gevaert in Belgium. It's available in 35mm, 120 rolfilm and 4x5" sheet film.

It's a pretty good film, certainly for the price which is almost the half of, the in the mean time discontinued, HIE from Kodak. For Eur. 8,35 (120 rolfilm) and Eur. 8,70 (35mm) in our program. Data (in German) is available on our NL-website.

For further questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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MickA
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Postby MickA » Tue Jan 17, 2006 4:03 pm

Hi
I am now in a position to answer my own question having exposed my first film and developed it. I exposed the first frame without filter rated at 400 ISO as a test neg. The rest of the exposures were taken with an R72 filter and a hand held meter set to 25 ISO, readings were incident. I was a little concerned due to it being January in the north of England, not much in the line of active growth of vegatation etc. A 25A filter may have been a better option, allowing more of the visable spectrum to record.
I bracketed shots and found that in hazy winter sun in an open landscape with blue sky and light cloud formation, one stop slower than metered reading gave a very acceptable neg. I will use ISO 12 for my next role if using R72 opaque filter. The unfiltered neg at ISO 400 seemed quite resonable. The film was given a presoak the resulting water was deep blue on draining so I guess it does have a anti-halation layer. I developed it in ID 11 stock for 6 min @ 20deg 7 min may be better. hope this helps others as regards a starting point. I have made one print, the grain is very fine and the print shows good detail no halo effect evident from bright highlights or light subjects. Film was used in a fuji 645 rangefinder, you still have a clear viewfinder with opaque filter! Dimpled pressure plate is not so much of a problem, 120 film has matt black paper backing.

foto-r3
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Postby foto-r3 » Sat Apr 01, 2006 11:42 am

I would agree that this polyester-based film is yielding very good results in a variety of conditions.

By the way, there is a designer developer for IR films called INFRADOL, available in 125ml. bottles (liquid). Used at a dilution of 1+9, it can be used to develop this film at exposure indexes of 400, 800, 1600 and 3200. It may also be used with Kodak HIE at 400, 800 and 1600.

Anyone interested in more information, please email us.

Mark
foto-r3.com


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