maximum sharpnes

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

Moderator: Keith Tapscott.

milhouse
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 8:50 am

maximum sharpnes

Postby milhouse » Thu Feb 16, 2006 3:47 pm

What combination of film and developer should I choose, to get maximum sharpnes. I've used agfa apx 100 and rodinal 1+100 and was pretty much sattisfied. Apx films are lately very hard to get so i'm thinging of getting something new. Long tonal scale is allso very important to me, fine grain too. What I'm looking for is a 50 or 100 iso film, extremely sharp with long tonal scale. I'm thinking of MACO films. I'm a hasselblad user and I don't mix chemicals myself.

thanks


Lowell Huff
Posts: 129
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 6:09 pm
Location: Los Angeles, CA 90061
Contact:

Postby Lowell Huff » Thu Feb 16, 2006 5:37 pm

Our Clayton F76plus Developer is a gamma 1 developer with very wide latitude and contrast control. If you would like a sample, contact me.
Lowlel Huff
askus@claytonchem.com

Jay DeFehr
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 8:40 pm

Delta

Postby Jay DeFehr » Thu Feb 16, 2006 6:09 pm

Ilford Delta 100 is extremely sharp, and fine grained.

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: maximum sharpnes

Postby Ornello » Mon Feb 27, 2006 5:00 pm

milhouse wrote:What combination of film and developer should I choose, to get maximum sharpnes. I've used agfa apx 100 and rodinal 1+100 and was pretty much sattisfied. Apx films are lately very hard to get so i'm thinging of getting something new. Long tonal scale is allso very important to me, fine grain too. What I'm looking for is a 50 or 100 iso film, extremely sharp with long tonal scale. I'm thinking of MACO films. I'm a hasselblad user and I don't mix chemicals myself.

thanks
Fuji Acros Neopan 100 in Paterson FX-39 or Acutol

Ilford Delta 100 in Paterson FX-39

Ilford FP4 Plus in Paterson Acutol

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Sun Mar 26, 2006 4:47 am

Wot, no Pan f Plus?! :o

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Postby Ornello » Mon Mar 27, 2006 12:57 pm

Keith Tapscott. wrote:Wot, no Pan f Plus?! :o
Pan-F is very fine grained, but Ilford Delta 100 and Fuji Neopan 100 Acros may be a little sharper or about the same. Pan-F has very limited latitude. I cannot see using Pan-F when these two films excel it in many respects.

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Mar 28, 2006 6:39 am

Ornello wrote:
Keith Tapscott. wrote:Wot, no Pan f Plus?! :o
Pan-F is very fine grained, but Ilford Delta 100 and Fuji Neopan 100 Acros may be a little sharper or about the same. Pan-F has very limited latitude. I cannot see using Pan-F when these two films excel it in many respects.
I was just having a bit of fun with the Pan F line, not that I dislike it or anything, but haven`t used any for a few years now.
On a more serious note, I have just bought the latest issue of the `Amateur Photographer` magazine which this week is a special edition dedicated to B&W photography. Inside on the question and answers page, there is question about not being able to get hold of Paterson stop-bath.
There is a reply from Roger Parry of Paterson Ltd.

"The plant that produced our chemistry for our formulations (including stop-bath) has closed. It looks like, due to diminishing demand, we will discontinue all the Paterson chemistry.
We will of course , continue to produce the full range of Paterson darkroom equipment".

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Postby Ornello » Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:14 am

Keith Tapscott. wrote:
Ornello wrote:
Keith Tapscott. wrote:Wot, no Pan f Plus?! :o
Pan-F is very fine grained, but Ilford Delta 100 and Fuji Neopan 100 Acros may be a little sharper or about the same. Pan-F has very limited latitude. I cannot see using Pan-F when these two films excel it in many respects.
I was just having a bit of fun with the Pan F line, not that I dislike it or anything, but haven`t used any for a few years now.
On a more serious note, I have just bought the latest issue of the `Amateur Photographer` magazine which this week is a special edition dedicated to B&W photography. Inside on the question and answers page, there is question about not being able to get hold of Paterson stop-bath.
There is a reply from Roger Parry of Paterson Ltd.

"The plant that produced our chemistry for our formulations (including stop-bath) has closed. It looks like, due to diminishing demand, we will discontinue all the Paterson chemistry.
We will of course , continue to produce the full range of Paterson darkroom equipment".
WHAT? Are you kidding?

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:26 am

Ornello wrote:
Keith Tapscott. wrote:
Ornello wrote: Pan-F is very fine grained, but Ilford Delta 100 and Fuji Neopan 100 Acros may be a little sharper or about the same. Pan-F has very limited latitude. I cannot see using Pan-F when these two films excel it in many respects.
I was just having a bit of fun with the Pan F line, not that I dislike it or anything, but haven`t used any for a few years now.
On a more serious note, I have just bought the latest issue of the `Amateur Photographer` magazine which this week is a special edition dedicated to B&W photography. Inside on the question and answers page, there is question about not being able to get hold of Paterson stop-bath.
There is a reply from Roger Parry of Paterson Ltd.

"The plant that produced our chemistry for our formulations (including stop-bath) has closed. It looks like, due to diminishing demand, we will discontinue all the Paterson chemistry.
We will of course , continue to produce the full range of Paterson darkroom equipment".
WHAT? Are you kidding?
Unfortunately not, even though the magazine is dated as the weekend of 1st of April (not a joke).
It is on page 24 in the AP Answers+ section and is a question asked by a reader called Jonathon Reid. You can order this copy from www.amateurphotographer.com

I suggest you contact Paterson Ltd to confirm the report. (Sorry for the bad news).

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Postby Ornello » Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:36 am

Keith Tapscott. wrote:
Ornello wrote:
Keith Tapscott. wrote: I was just having a bit of fun with the Pan F line, not that I dislike it or anything, but haven`t used any for a few years now.
On a more serious note, I have just bought the latest issue of the `Amateur Photographer` magazine which this week is a special edition dedicated to B&W photography. Inside on the question and answers page, there is question about not being able to get hold of Paterson stop-bath.
There is a reply from Roger Parry of Paterson Ltd.

"The plant that produced our chemistry for our formulations (including stop-bath) has closed. It looks like, due to diminishing demand, we will discontinue all the Paterson chemistry.
We will of course , continue to produce the full range of Paterson darkroom equipment".
WHAT? Are you kidding?
Unfortunately not, even though the magazine is dated as the weekend of 1st of April (not a joke).
It is on page 24 in the AP Answers+ section and is a question asked by a reader called Jonathon Reid. You can order this copy from www.amateurphotographer.com

I suggest you contact Paterson Ltd to confirm the report. (Sorry for the bad news).
This is ridiculous.

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Mar 28, 2006 11:33 am

Best to check it out with Paterson`s first. Unless another company is found to make their chemicals, then I guess it`s just a matter of time before the current stock is depleted. Contact the company by e-mail and quote the report from the magazine:

sales@paterson.co.uk

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Postby Ornello » Tue Mar 28, 2006 11:57 am

Keith Tapscott. wrote:Best to check it out with Paterson`s first. Unless another company is found to make their chemicals, then I guess it`s just a matter of time before the current stock is depleted. Contact the company by e-mail and quote the report from the magazine:

sales@paterson.co.uk
I don't talk to Paterson. Their times are screwy, and they insist they are not. Go ahead and ask if you wish.

Jay DeFehr
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 8:40 pm

Make your own

Postby Jay DeFehr » Wed Mar 29, 2006 3:19 am

There are many developer formulae published, most are simple to make up and use, many produce results at least the equal of any commercial formula, and some are superior to commercial developers. A good scale, and a little care are all that's required to make up a developer from bulk chemicals, and then one need not worry about their developer of choice being discontinued, or becoming unavailable.

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Re: Make your own

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Wed Mar 29, 2006 5:14 am

Jay DeFehr wrote:There are many developer formulae published, most are simple to make up and use, many produce results at least the equal of any commercial formula, and some are superior to commercial developers. A good scale, and a little care are all that's required to make up a developer from bulk chemicals, and then one need not worry about their developer of choice being discontinued, or becoming unavailable.
I bought some photo-chemicals just recently along with a scale that reads 0.1 gram increments up to 500kg. (Digital readings).
The constituents that I currently have are: Metol, Hydroquinone, Borax, Kodalk, Sodium Carbonate (anhydrous), Potassium Bromide, Sodium Sulphite (anhydrous) and some Sodium Hexametaphosphate.
Enough to get stated with hopefully. Also, a copy of the Rayco Formulae Book, 4th Edition.

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: Make your own

Postby Ornello » Wed Mar 29, 2006 4:03 pm

Jay DeFehr wrote:There are many developer formulae published, most are simple to make up and use, many produce results at least the equal of any commercial formula, and some are superior to commercial developers. A good scale, and a little care are all that's required to make up a developer from bulk chemicals, and then one need not worry about their developer of choice being discontinued, or becoming unavailable.
Paterson developers are the best available. Nothing I can mix is as good, unfortunately.


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