to squeegee or not to squeegee

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

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Justin
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:18 am

to squeegee or not to squeegee

Postby Justin » Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:33 am

I've had some problems scratching the occasional film which i can only assume is a consequence of squeegeeing.Having tried all manner of things including changing my squeegee and softening the squeegee in warm water, i've now given up and have started to use a piece of shammy leather which i just run gently down the plastic side of the film.Seems to do the trick so far but any advice on suitable alternatives would be very welcome.I seem to remember a colleague years ago used to run a piece of kitchen roll down the one side.Any thoughts on this?


Ornello
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Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Re: to squeegee or not to squeegee

Postby Ornello » Fri Mar 31, 2006 12:16 pm

Justin wrote:I've had some problems scratching the occasional film which i can only assume is a consequence of squeegeeing.Having tried all manner of things including changing my squeegee and softening the squeegee in warm water, i've now given up and have started to use a piece of shammy leather which i just run gently down the plastic side of the film.Seems to do the trick so far but any advice on suitable alternatives would be very welcome.I seem to remember a colleague years ago used to run a piece of kitchen roll down the one side.Any thoughts on this?
I recommend not to squeegee. Simply allow the film to dry without touching it.

Fotohuis
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Location: the Netherlands
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Postby Fotohuis » Sat Apr 01, 2006 2:11 pm

Every mechanical contact with a wet film emulsion is a risk for scratches if something is between the rubber squeege and the film. Depending on the brand of the film and developing temperature the emulsion is even more sensitive.

If you squeege the film with a real clean soft rubber squeege with wetting agent, only one time in one stroke.

A lot of photographers do not squeege the film at all. Last step is the wetting agent often in combination with deionized water, they let drip off the water and let the film dry at room temperature in a clean dust free area. Minimum risk, but takes more time.

All other methods with heated film dryers (even with micro filter) or additional I.P.A. (to speed up drying) are causing an extra risk for your film emulsion.

It's an often discussed topic on all photographic forums.
"De enige beperking in je fotografie ben je zelf"

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Justin
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:18 am

Postby Justin » Sun Apr 02, 2006 11:25 am

Many thanks to Ornello and Robert.I'm sure this was a more elementary question than you are accustomed to on this forum,but i'm grateful for the advice nevertheless.
Re de-ionised or distilled water,this seems prohibitively expensive to me.Could i substitute this with bottled water or a good filter system.Any recommendations?
Once again thanks.

Fotohuis
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Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 12:25 pm
Location: the Netherlands
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Postby Fotohuis » Mon Apr 03, 2006 3:17 am

De-ionised water is only necessary for the last step with the wetting agent if there is a large amount of carbonates into your (drinking) water. Depends on the aera and supplier.
In Europe, a DH of 16 or more is for a lot of potographers a reason to do someting about it to prevent a drying problem on their films. A Britta filter is in fact doing the same but so far working till the filter is saturated.

The quality for de-ionised water to fill up your battery in the car is sufficient for it. You don't need expensive distilled or milliQ (reversed osmose) water which is used in a lab.
"De enige beperking in je fotografie ben je zelf"

http://www.FotohuisRoVo.nl
http://gallery.fotohuisrovo.nl/


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