Infrared

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

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Ornello
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Infrared

Postby Ornello » Mon Nov 24, 2008 2:34 pm

I see that Kodak has discontinued their HS infrared film. What others are available now?


Keith Tapscott.
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Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Mon Nov 24, 2008 4:42 pm

I don`t think there`s a lot of alternatives out there.
http://www.digitaltruth.com/store/cart/ ... c-223.html

RJ-
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Postby RJ- » Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:22 pm

Mike,

You may be surprised at Rollei IR400 ~ it is quite an alternative to Kodak HIE.

Although it's operating sensitivity for infrared can drop to as low as ISO1-3, it is a remarkably fine grain film for such a high nominal ISO speed of 400. When coupled with a modern T-grain/cubic crystal specialist developer like Paterson FX39, the grain is further suppressed resulting in a high acutance image. The mildly compensating characteristics of the developer can add 1/2 stop for critical shadow detail work, however in practice, infrared light in subdued shadows won't alter the overall image.

The near-IR spectral sensitivity of the Rollei IR400 from 650nm to 750nm bears more in common with the former Konica IR750 film and is more of a pictorial infrared film, than the incredible grain of Kodak HIE. Since it is available in 35mm, 120mm and sheet film of 4x5" dimensions, it probably represents the finest infrared imaging material for critical print enlargements from negatives.

Another alternative not listed in the Digital Truth Catalog is the long-standing Ilford SFX200 film. This is a near-IR sensitised emulsion similar to Ilford FP4+ and can be developed in your favourite developer, Paterson FX39 according to the Digital Truth algorithms. Being available in 35mm or 120mm format only, the grain is perhaps less appealing and is more modest as a near-IR film.

The Efke IR820 emulsion is a classical traditional emulsion with medium grain (comparable to Ilford SFX) and approaches true IR spectral sensitivity. It is now probably the only emulsion left on the market capable of offering any IR sensitivity almost in the true IR spectrum. IR imaging work with a halo effect is possible with the EfkeIR820 by overexposing the film. (Maco Aura 820 is also recently discontinued).

Rollei were due to introduce Superpan 200 which has extended red sensitivity (suitable for work with a 695nm IR cut-off filter). Similarly, the recently discontinued Rollei R3 emulsion has an extended red/near IR sensitivity which works with an IR 695nm cut-off filter. The Rolle ATP1.1 may offer extended red sensitivity too, however I've not elicited anything vaguely resembling the infrared effects of Rollei IR400 from this.

Hope that helps.

Kind regards,

RJ

Ornello
Posts: 833
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 9:49 am

Postby Ornello » Fri Nov 28, 2008 6:23 pm

RJ- wrote:Mike,

You may be surprised at Rollei IR400 ~ it is quite an alternative to Kodak HIE.

Although it's operating sensitivity for infrared can drop to as low as ISO1-3, it is a remarkably fine grain film for such a high nominal ISO speed of 400. When coupled with a modern T-grain/cubic crystal specialist developer like Paterson FX39, the grain is further suppressed resulting in a high acutance image. The mildly compensating characteristics of the developer can add 1/2 stop for critical shadow detail work, however in practice, infrared light in subdued shadows won't alter the overall image.

The near-IR spectral sensitivity of the Rollei IR400 from 650nm to 750nm bears more in common with the former Konica IR750 film and is more of a pictorial infrared film, than the incredible grain of Kodak HIE. Since it is available in 35mm, 120mm and sheet film of 4x5" dimensions, it probably represents the finest infrared imaging material for critical print enlargements from negatives.

Another alternative not listed in the Digital Truth Catalog is the long-standing Ilford SFX200 film. This is a near-IR sensitised emulsion similar to Ilford FP4+ and can be developed in your favourite developer, Paterson FX39 according to the Digital Truth algorithms. Being available in 35mm or 120mm format only, the grain is perhaps less appealing and is more modest as a near-IR film.

The Efke IR820 emulsion is a classical traditional emulsion with medium grain (comparable to Ilford SFX) and approaches true IR spectral sensitivity. It is now probably the only emulsion left on the market capable of offering any IR sensitivity almost in the true IR spectrum. IR imaging work with a halo effect is possible with the EfkeIR820 by overexposing the film. (Maco Aura 820 is also recently discontinued).

Rollei were due to introduce Superpan 200 which has extended red sensitivity (suitable for work with a 695nm IR cut-off filter). Similarly, the recently discontinued Rollei R3 emulsion has an extended red/near IR sensitivity which works with an IR 695nm cut-off filter. The Rolle ATP1.1 may offer extended red sensitivity too, however I've not elicited anything vaguely resembling the infrared effects of Rollei IR400 from this.

Hope that helps.

Kind regards,

RJ
Sources for these materials?

foolscape
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Postby foolscape » Sat Nov 29, 2008 3:56 am


Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Sat Dec 06, 2008 3:43 pm

I used Kodak HIE occasionally for `effect` with outdoor portraits.
Getting the exposure correct can be a bit hit and miss, so it is well worth bracketing your exposures. The newer films might be a bit more forgiving.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/taps-fotos/3070818590/


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