developing Ilford HP5 Plus 400 b&w film

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

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hasil
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 7:08 pm

developing Ilford HP5 Plus 400 b&w film

Postby hasil » Fri Apr 29, 2005 7:22 pm

I am new to photography and I would like to develop my own film at home.

I purchased a tank, Ilford Ilfosol S film developer, Kodafix solution, and Photo-Flo 200 solution. Each lists the dilution ratio and temp requirement as well as the duration for processing. However, I am wondering if I need to use a Hypo Clear solution between the fix and the photo-flo. [I'm unsure what Hypo Clear is but they did not give me the solution at the store I purchased my supplies from.]

I'm unsure how to proceed at this point.

Also, I was told that I dont need Stop if I rinse the film well enough with plain water. I hope this is correct as well.

I hope I've explained this clearly enough for someone to answer my question.


Digitaltruth
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Postby Digitaltruth » Mon May 02, 2005 11:58 am

The information you have been given is correct, you do not need a stop bath or hypo clear solution.

A chemical stop bath is used to arrest development instantaneously, but this is not necessary for the vast majority of applications. Many people use a chemical stop to help prolong the life of the fixer, as it eliminates carry over from the developer, but the advantage of this procedure is marginal. I recommend filling the tank with water and dumping it out three times between the developer and fixing stages, as this will remove most of the residual developer, but can be accomplished quickly enough to avoid any significant continuation of the development process.

Hypo Clear is used to chemically remove fixer. This is not generally necessary for film. Many people like to use Hypo Clear to reduce their washing times, but modern emulsions are very hard-wearing and although you will save about 10-15 minutes of washing time, no harm will be done to your film by normal (or even overlong) wash times. Again, I would leave this chemical out for most applications.
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hasil
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 7:08 pm

Postby hasil » Thu May 12, 2005 5:52 pm

Thanks for confirming that.

By the way. If you happen to return to this topic, I'm just wondering how crucial the temp is for the other chemicals versus the temp for the developer and how do you pick out a good thermometer. Right now I'm using a lazer thermometer, because it's what we happen have. Do they make special thermometers for testing chemistry?


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