Black and White film processing

Film Photography & Darkroom discussion

Moderator: Keith Tapscott.

shades
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 10:49 am

Black and White film processing

Postby shades » Mon Jan 16, 2006 11:04 am

Hello,

Wonder if anyone can help?.. am currently using Kodak HC110 film dev in a Nova processing tank and am having touble with my dev times.
When processing Neopan 400-1600 35mm films the requried dev time varies.. I keep getting under processed films at the recommended dev times.. Also having the same problem with the Kodak T-Max range. Is there a universal dev that anyone can recomend...or has anyone else had a similar problem?

Lesley


Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Re: Black and White film processing

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:11 am

shades wrote:Hello,

Wonder if anyone can help?.. am currently using Kodak HC110 film dev in a Nova processing tank and am having touble with my dev times.
When processing Neopan 400-1600 35mm films the requried dev time varies.. I keep getting under processed films at the recommended dev times.. Also having the same problem with the Kodak T-Max range. Is there a universal dev that anyone can recomend...or has anyone else had a similar problem?

Lesley
I am not familiar with the processing tank that you have mentioned, is the Nova tank a small inversion tank?
I use both Paterson and Jobo 1500 series tanks myself with inversion agitation. I assume you are using HC110 at dilution B. The times that I see for Neopan 400 in HC110 dilution B is 5 minutes at 20C/68F and the usual way to increase contrast is to develop a little longer although this will also increase graininess. You could try increasing development in 30 second increments until you reach the desired contrast or stick with your current times and try a harder grade of paper. Also, are you exposing your films properly?

shades
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 10:49 am

Thank you...

Postby shades » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:27 am

Hi,

Thanks for your advice, will try that. We are a small lab so I have no way of knowing about the film exposure.
The tank is a 2 litre tank that take's 4 spools of 35mm at a time if that sheds any light on things.

Thanks Again
Lesley

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Re: Thank you...

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:46 am

shades wrote:Hi,

Thanks for your advice, will try that. We are a small lab so I have no way of knowing about the film exposure.
The tank is a 2 litre tank that take's 4 spools of 35mm at a time if that sheds any light on things.

Thanks Again
Lesley
Hello Lesley,
Just a suggestion, HC110 at it`s optimal allround dilution B can give development times that are a little too short for comfort with some films making it more difficult for close control of contrast while using a weaker dilution, while allowing longer developing times can make the films a little more grainy and flatten the tonality. The classic industry trade standard developers are Kodak D-76 & Ilford ID11 which I use myself, but these have to be mixed from powder to make a stock solution which you may find inconvenient. Take a look at Ilford DD-X which is a more modern developer of which Ilford supply developing times for Fuji, Agfa, Kodak as well as their own films. There is also Ilfotec DD (Dip & Dunk) which is exactly the same stuff but supplied in larger containers and is more cost effective than buying DD-X in 1 litre bottles.
As I said, it`s just a suggestion.
Cheers,
Keith.

shades
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 10:49 am

Your a very helpful man..

Postby shades » Tue Jan 17, 2006 11:05 am

I have been looking into the id11 myself and think it may be worth the extra mixing up time. What you have just explained is the very thing that is happening. The negs looked thin at the correct time and then heavy and grainy when I add 30 - 60 seconds extra.
I think I might be making a purchase of the id11..
Thanks evenmore..
Lesley

Keith Tapscott.
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:58 am
Location: Plymouth, England.

Postby Keith Tapscott. » Tue Jan 17, 2006 11:32 am

D-76 & ID11 have been tried and trusted over many decades and are hard to beat. I actually prefer the results of T-Max films developed in D-76 than when they`re processed in T-MAX developers. (Unless the films are P-3200TMZ or Delta 3200.)


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