INFRARED FILM


Efke IR820

Kodak HIE

Ilford SFX200

Rollei IR400

Photo credit: © Gary A. Reese, College of Southern Nevada, Department of Media Technologies, North Las Vegas, NV, USA

The images above are details of larger negatives and are shown here as examples of each film's characteristics and spectral response. All photographs were taken using an R72 Infrared filter, and developed in Xtol for the recommended time. The example images provide a good idea of the different qualities each film offers, but should be seen as an introductory guide only. Each film is capable of rendering greater or less contrast depending on the filtration, exposure and development.

Efke IR820

The closest in infrared sensitivity to Kodak HIE, Efke IR820 has similar characteristics to the Kodak film. Foliage appears white and glowing, overall contrast is slightly soft and the grain is textural. Efke IR820 will produce good results with a standard red #25 filter, and stronger effects with an R72 filter.

Kodak HIE

Kodak's High Speed Infrared film is renowned for the grainy dreamlike images which it is capable of producing. HIE has the highest infrared sensitivity of all the IR films, and will produce strong IR effects with minimal filtration.

Ilford SFX200

Technically, this film is an extended red rather than a true infrared film; however, it offers very fine grain and nice IR effects. Foliage is lightened, but not to the extent of the other IR films. R72 Infrared filter required for IR effects.

Rollei IR400

Much finer grained than the Kodak or Efke film, Rollei IR400 shows more of a split Wood effect, with some areas of foliage glowing white, while other areas are darker. More contrast than Efke IR820. A #25 filter can be used, but an R72 Infrared filter is recommended.

Note: All results have been provided by independent testers. Scans and images have NOT been manipulated.